Sir John Philipps, 6th Baronet

Welsh politician and lawyer

A 1748 illustration of Philipps
Picton Castle

Sir John Philipps, 6th Baronet, PC (c. 1701 – 22 June 1764) was a Welsh politician and lawyer who served as Lord Lieutenant of Haverfordwest from 1761 to 1764. Sir John was the son of Sir John Philipps, 4th Baronet. He studied at Pembroke College, Oxford, and went on to Lincoln’s Inn.[1]

In 1736 he was elected mayor of Haverfordwest and in 1741 he became MP for Carmarthen. In 1743, his elder brother, Sir Erasmus Philipps, 5th Baronet, was accidentally drowned, and Sir John inherited the baronetcy and Picton Castle. He gave up the Carmarthenshire seat in 1747, but re-entered Parliament as MP for Petersfield (1754–1761), and Pembrokeshire (1761–1764). In 1763 he became a privy counsellor.[1]

A patron of education, he founded several scholarships at his former Oxford college. Proposed by his elder brother, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1742.[2] In 1725, he married Elizabeth, the daughter of Henry Shepherd of London, with whom he had a son and 3 daughters. Among the family’s servants was Cesar Picton, a former slave from Senegal, who later became a successful coal merchant in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey.[3] The family lived for many years at Norbiton Place, an estate just outside Kingston, and Sir John died here on 22 June 1764.[4] He was succeeded by the son, Richard, who was created Baron Milford in 1776.

References[edit]

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  1. ^ a b .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit;word-wrap:break-word}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation:target{background-color:rgba(0,127,255,0.133)}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free.id-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited.id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration.id-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription.id-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#2C882D;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}@media(prefers-color-scheme:dark){html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}}“Philipps, John (1700-64), of Picton Castle, Pemb”. History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2014.
  2. ^ “Fellows Details”. Royal Society. Retrieved 10 May 2014.
  3. ^ Historic England. “Picton House, Kingston upon Thames (1080069)”. National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  4. ^ Prosser, G.F. (1828). Select Illustrations of the County of Surrey. Rivington, London. Accessed 9 April 2020
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by

Member of Parliament for Carmarthen
1741–1747
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of Parliament for Petersfield
1754–1761
With: William Gerard Hamilton
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of Parliament for Pembrokeshire
1761–1764
Succeeded by

Honorary titles
New title

Lord Lieutenant of Haverfordwest
1761–1764
Vacant

Title next held by

Sir Richard Philipps, Bt

Baronetage of England
Preceded by

Baronet
(of Picton Castle)
1743–1764
Succeeded by