Robert Monckton-Arundell, 4th Viscount Galway

English peer and politician

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The Viscount Galway

Portrait of Viscount Galway by Thomas Hudson, 1779
Member of Parliament for Pontefract
In office
1801–1802

Preceded by Parliament of Great Britain
Succeeded by John Smyth
In office
1796–1801

Serving with John Smyth
Preceded by William Sotheron
John Smyth
Succeeded by Parliament of the United Kingdom
Member of Parliament for York
In office
1783–1790

Preceded by Charles Turner
Lord John Cavendish
Succeeded by Sir William Mordaunt Milner, Bt
Richard Slater Milnes
Member of Parliament for Pontefract
In office
1780–1783

Serving with William Nedham
Preceded by Sir John Goodricke, Bt
Charles Mellish
Succeeded by William Nedham
Nathaniel Smith
Personal details
Born
Robert Monckton-Arundell

(1752-07-04)4 July 1752

Died 23 July 1810(1810-07-23) (aged 58)
Spouse(s) .mw-parser-output .marriage-line-margin2px{line-height:0;margin-bottom:-2px}.mw-parser-output .marriage-line-margin3px{line-height:0;margin-bottom:-3px}.mw-parser-output .marriage-display-ws{display:inline;white-space:nowrap}

Elizabeth Mathew

(m. .mw-parser-output .tooltip-dotted{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}1779; died 1801)​

Mary Bridget Milnes Drummond

(m. 1803; died 1810)​

Parent(s) William Monckton-Arundell, 2nd Viscount Galway
Elizabeth Villareal

Robert Monckton-Arundell, 4th Viscount Galway, PC KB (4 July 1752 – 23 July 1810) was an English peer and politician.

Early life[edit]

He was the second surviving of three sons and two daughters born to William Monckton-Arundell, 2nd Viscount Galway and the former Elizabeth Villareal. His father served as Receiver-General of the Crown rents for Yorkshire, Westmorland and Durham before being returned to Parliament as a Member for Pontefract and Thirsk. Among his siblings were sisters Hon. Elizabeth Monckton (wife of Sir Francis Sykes, 1st Baronet and Sir Drummond Smith, 1st Baronet) and Hon. Frances Charlotte Monckton (wife of Anthony Burlton-Bennett).[1]

His paternal grandparents were John Monckton, 1st Viscount Galway and Lady Elizabeth Manners (a daughter of John Manners, 2nd Duke of Rutland).[2] His maternal grandparents were Joseph Isaac Villareal and Kitty da Costa (a well known English Sephardi Jew who converted to Christianity; she was a daughter of Joseph da Costa, a gold and coral trader who owned Manor of Copped Hall in Totteridge).[3]

He succeeded his elder unmarried brother Henry to the title in 1774.[1]

Career[edit]

He was elected Member of Parliament to represent Pontefract from 1780 to 1783, made a Privy Counsellor in 1784 and knighted in the Order of the Bath in 1786. He gave up his seat in 1783 following an appointment by Lord Shelburne as envoy to the Elector Palatine, however, the fall of the Government in March prevented his taking up the appointment.[4] In the subsequent general election, Galway was elected unopposed for the York constituency in 1783, serving until 1790. He spoke and voted against Fox‘s East India bill, 27 November 1783. He stood unsuccessfully for Pontefract in 1790, but was returned in 1796, serving until he resigned his seat in 1802.[5]

His career also included service as Comptroller of the Household (1784–87) during the reign of King George III.[4]

Personal life[edit]

On 1 March 1779, Lord Galway married Elizabeth Mathew (c. 1760–1801), the daughter of Daniel Mathew of Felix Hall, Essex. Elizabeth’s sister, Louisa, was the wife of James Gambier, 1st Baron Gambier, and her youngest sister, Jane, was the mother of Sir Edward John Gambier. Before her death on 19 November 1801, they were the parents of five sons and four daughters, including:[1]

  • William George Monckton-Arundell, 5th Viscount Galway (1782–1834), who married Catherine Elizabeth Handfield, daughter of Capt. George Handfield, in 1804.[6]
  • Hon. Robert Henry Monckton-Arundell (d. 1813)[7]
  • Hon. Charles Frederick Monckton-Arundell (d. 1798)[7]
  • Hon. Augustus Philip Monckton-Arundell (d. 1802)[7]
  • Hon. Carleton Thomas Monckton-Arundell (1797–1830), a Captain of the 22nd Light Dragoons.[8]
  • Hon. Elizabeth Mary Monckton-Arundell (d. 1840)[7]
  • Hon. Henrietta Maria Monckton-Arundell (d. 1847), who married Robert Pemberton Milnes of Fryston Hall, son of Richard Slater Milnes, in 1808.[9]
  • Hon. Charlotte Penelope Monckton-Arundell (d. 1806)[7]
  • Hon. Frances Jane Monckton-Arundell (d. 1854)[7]

After the death of his first wife, he married Mary Bridget (née Milnes) Drummond on 24 May 1803. Mary Bridget, the widow of Peter Auriol Hay Drummond (son of Archbishop Robert Hay Drummond and grandson of the 8th Earl of Kinnoull), was the only child and heiress of Pemberton Milnes of Bawtry Hall, Yorkshire (a prosperous wool-merchant from Wakefield) and Jane Slater (a daughter of Dr .Adam Slater). There were no children of this marriage.[4]

Upon his death on 23 July 1810, he was succeeded by his son William. His widow died on 15 November 1835.[1]

Descendants[edit]

Through his daughter Henrietta, he was a grandfather of Henrietta Maria Milnes (who married her cousin George Monckton-Arundell, 6th Viscount Galway), and Richard Monckton Milnes, 1st Baron Houghton (who married Hon. Annabella Crewe, daughter of John Crewe, 2nd Baron Crewe).[9]

References[edit]

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  1. ^ a b c d Mosley, Charles, editor. Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes. Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003, volume 2, page 1521.
  2. ^ .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit;word-wrap:break-word}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation:target{background-color:rgba(0,127,255,0.133)}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free.id-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited.id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration.id-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription.id-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#2C882D;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}@media(prefers-color-scheme:dark){html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}}“The Monckton-Arundell Family of Serlby Hall: A Brief History”. www.nottingham.ac.uk. The University of Nottingham. Retrieved 21 November 2023.
  3. ^ Hemming, T. D.; Freeman, E.; Freeman, Ted; Meakin, David (1994). The Secular City: Studies in the Enlightenment : Presented to Haydn Mason. University of Exeter. p. 48. ISBN 978-0-85989-416-6.
  4. ^ a b c “Biography of Robert Monckton-Arundell, 4th Viscount Galway (1758-1810)”. www.nottingham.ac.uk. The University of Nottingham. Retrieved 21 November 2023.
  5. ^ “MONCKTON ARUNDELL, Robert, 4th Visct. Galway [I] (1752-1810)”. History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 12 April 2016.
  6. ^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume V, page 615.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Kearsley’s Peerage | Scotland & Ireland: Vol. II: Together with an Extinct Peerage of the Three Kingdoms List of All Their Family Names, Titles of Elder Sons & and Translation of Their Mottos. G. Kearsley. 1804. pp. 547–551. Retrieved 21 November 2023.
  8. ^ M’Donogh, Felix (1819). “The hermit in London, or Sketches of English manners”. lib-cat.trin.cam.ac.uk. Printed for Henry Colburn, Public Library, Conduit Street. Retrieved 21 November 2023.
  9. ^ a b L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 89.

External links[edit]

Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by

Member of Parliament for Pontefract
1780–1783
With: William Nedham
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of Parliament for York
1783–1790
With: Lord John Cavendish 1783–1784
Richard Slater Milnes 1784–1790
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of Parliament for Pontefract
1796–1801
With: John Smyth
Succeeded by

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by

Parliament of Great Britain
Member of Parliament for Pontefract
1801–1802
With: John Smyth
Succeeded by

Political offices
Preceded by

Comptroller of the Household
1784–1787
Succeeded by

Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by

Viscount Galway
1774–1810
Succeeded by