Peregrine Bertie, 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven

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General His Grace
The Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven
Lord Great Chamberlain
In office
1742–1778
Preceded by The Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven
Succeeded by The Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven
Personal details
Born
Peregrine Bertie

1714
England

Died 12 August 1778(1778-08-12) (aged 63–64)
England
Spouse(s) Elizabeth Blundell
Mary Panton
Children Lady Mary Catherine Bertie
Peregrine Thomas Bertie, Marquess of Lindsey
Robert Bertie, 4th Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven
Priscilla Bertie, 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby
Georgiana Cholmondeley, Marchioness of Cholmondeley
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General Peregrine Bertie, 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven PC (1714 – 12 August 1778), styled Lord Willoughby de Eresby from 1715 to 1723 and Marquess of Lindsey from 1735 to 1742, was an English peer.

Early life[edit]

Bertie was born in 1714 and, beginning, in 1715, was styled Lord Willoughby de Eresby. He was the eldest son of Peregrine Bertie, 2nd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, and Jane Brownlow (a daughter of Sir John Brownlow, 3rd Baronet).[1] Among his younger siblings were Lord Albemarle Bertie (a gambler and sportsman who was blinded early in his youth), Brownlow Bertie, 5th Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, Lady Mary Bertie (wife of Samuel Greatheed), Lady Albinia Bertie (wife of Francis Beckford), Lady Jane Bertie (wife of Gen. Edward Mathew), and Lady Caroline Bertie (wife of George Dewar).[1]

Career[edit]

On the death of his father in 1742, he succeeded him in the dukedom and as Lord Great Chamberlain and Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire, and was appointed to the Privy Council.

He gained the rank of Major-General on 19 January 1755, Lieutenant-General on 3 February 1759 and General on 25 May 1772.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Mary, Duchess of Ancaster and Kesteven, wife of the 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven.
Lady Cholmondeley and her son William Henry Hugh Cholmondeley, 3rd Marquess of Cholmondeley (1805), by Charles Turner

He married, firstly, Elizabeth (née Blundell) Nicoll (d. 1743), widow of Charles Gounter Nicoll, on 22 May 1735. Elizabeth was the daughter of William Blundell of Basingstoke, Hampshire, whose mother, Alice Blunden, was the alleged victim of a notorious premature burial.

After her death in 1743, he married, secondly, Mary Panton, on 27 November 1750. Mary was the daughter of Thomas Panton of Newmarket, who was an equerry to King George II and master of the Thurlow Hunt. They had six children:[2]

Lord Ancaster died on 12 August 1778 and was succeeded in his titles by his only surviving son, Robert. After Robert’s death in 1779 without a male heir, Peregrine’s younger brother, Brownlow, succeeded to the dukedom.[3]

References[edit]

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  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit;word-wrap:break-word}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation:target{background-color:rgba(0,127,255,0.133)}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free.id-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited.id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration.id-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription.id-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#2C882D;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}@media(prefers-color-scheme:dark){html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}}Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Burke’s Peerage Limited. 1914. p. 98. Retrieved 27 November 2019.
  2. ^ “Monumental Memoirs of the Bertie Family”. The Gentleman’s Magazine. 78: 21–22. 1808.
  3. ^ George Edward Cokayne, ed. Vicary Gibbs, The Complete Peerage, volume I (St Catherine Press, London 1910) page 128.
Political offices
Preceded by

Lord Great Chamberlain
1742–1778
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Master of the Horse to Queen Charlotte
1765–1766
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Master of the Horse
1766–1778
Succeeded by

Honorary titles
Preceded by

Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire
1742–1778
Succeeded by

Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by

Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven
1742–1778
Succeeded by

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