Joon (Korean name)

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Joon
Hangul
Hanja

Family or given: *: “handsome” Given name only: *: “standard” *: “obey” *: “deep”

Revised Romanization Jun
McCune–Reischauer Chun

Joon, also spelled Jun, Chun, or June, is a rare Korean family name, as well as a common element in Korean given names.

As a family name[edit]

The family name Joon is written with only one hanja, meaning (). The 2000 South Korean Census found 72 people with this family name. All belonged to one bon-gwan, from Cheongju.[1]

In given names[edit]

There are 34 hanja with the reading “Joon” on the South Korean government’s official list of hanja which may be used in given names; the more common ones are listed in the table above.[2]

Single-syllable given name[edit]

People with the given name Joon include:

  • Heo Jun (c. 1537 – 1615), Joseon Dynasty court physician
  • Yi Tjoune (1859–1907), late Joseon Dynasty and Korean Empire diplomat
  • Choe Jun (1884–1970), South Korean businessman
  • Oh Joon (born 1955), South Korean diplomat
  • Heo Jun (television personality) (born 1977), South Korean television personality
  • Jung Joon (born 1979), South Korean actor
  • Mun Jun (born 1982), South Korean speed skater
  • Park June (born 1986), South Korean professional computer gamer
  • Kwon Jun (born 1987), South Korean footballer
  • Ahn Jun (fl. 2000s), South Korean photographer

People with the stage name “Joon” include:

  • Kim Joon (Kim Hyung-joon, born 1984), South Korean rapper, former member of boy group T-max
  • Lee Joon (Lee Chang-sun, born 1988), South Korean singer, former member of boy group MBLAQ
  • Jun. K (Kim Min-joon, born 1988), South Korean singer-songwriter, member of boy group 2PM
  • Wen Junhui (born 1996), Chinese singer, member of South Korean boy group Seventeen

As name element[edit]

A few names containing this syllable have been popular over the years. Jun-young and Joon-ho were popular names for newborn boys in the 1970s through 1990s.[3] In the late 2000s and early 2010s, more names containing this syllable became popular, including Min-jun, Jun-seo, Ye-jun, Hyun-jun, and Seo-jun.[4][3]

Names beginning with this syllable include:

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Names ending with this syllable include:

See also[edit]

  • Pieter Joon (born 1942), Dutch athlete, founder of World Organization Volleyball for Disabled
  • Joon Wolfsberg (born 1992), German singer-songwriter

References[edit]

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  1. ^ .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit;word-wrap:break-word}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation:target{background-color:rgba(0,127,255,0.133)}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free.id-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited.id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration.id-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription.id-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#2C882D;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}@media(prefers-color-scheme:dark){html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}}“한국성씨일람” [List of Korean surnames]. Kyungpook National University. 2003-12-11. Retrieved 2013-10-30.
  2. ^ “인명용 한자표” [Table of hanja for use in personal names] (PDF). South Korea: Supreme Court. Retrieved 2013-10-17.
  3. ^ a b 2011년 인기 이름 리포트 (in Korean). Johnson’s Baby Center. Archived from the original on 2013-10-23. Retrieved 2013-10-22.
  4. ^ “남자 → ‘민준’ 여자 → ‘서연’ 가장 많아”. Law Times. 2010-01-20. Retrieved 2011-09-19.



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