Congregation Beth Adam

Coordinates: .mw-parser-output .geo-default,.mw-parser-output .geo-dms,.mw-parser-output .geo-dec{display:inline}.mw-parser-output .geo-nondefault,.mw-parser-output .geo-multi-punct,.mw-parser-output .geo-inline-hidden{display:none}.mw-parser-output .longitude,.mw-parser-output .latitude{white-space:nowrap}39°14′14″N 84°18′19″W / 39.2371580°N 84.3054166°W / 39.2371580; -84.3054166
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Congregation Beth Adam
Religion
Affiliation Judaism
Rite Independent Liberal Humanistic
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Synagogue
Leadership .mw-parser-output .plainlist ol,.mw-parser-output .plainlist ul{line-height:inherit;list-style:none;margin:0;padding:0}.mw-parser-output .plainlist ol li,.mw-parser-output .plainlist ul li{margin-bottom:0}

  • Rabbi Robert B. Barr, D.D.
  • Rabbi David Burstein
Status Active
Location
Location Loveland-Madeira Road, Loveland, Ohio
Country United States
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Congregation Beth Adam is located in Ohio

Congregation Beth Adam
Location in Ohio
Geographic coordinates .mw-parser-output .geo-default,.mw-parser-output .geo-dms,.mw-parser-output .geo-dec{display:inline}.mw-parser-output .geo-nondefault,.mw-parser-output .geo-multi-punct,.mw-parser-output .geo-inline-hidden{display:none}.mw-parser-output .longitude,.mw-parser-output .latitude{white-space:nowrap}39°14′14″N 84°18′19″W / 39.2371580°N 84.3054166°W / 39.2371580; -84.3054166
Architecture
Date established 1980
Website
bethadam.org

Congregation Beth Adam is a Humanistic Jewish synagogue located in Loveland, Ohio.[1] Beth Adam gives voice to Judaism with a humanistic perspective. The congregation was founded by Rabbi Robert B. Barr in 1980.

Overview[edit]

Beth Adam’s mission is to be a “unique community integrating Jewish tradition and humanistic principles.” Its vision – to be “a spiritual home, a meaningful voice, and a humanistic resource for people worldwide, seeking a contemporary Jewish identity and experience.”[2]

The congregation made history when it’s application for membership into the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC) (now the Union of Reform Judaism (URJ)) was not accepted.[3] Beth Adam’s application challenged the Reform movement to determine if it was willing to embrace a wide spectrum of belief. As Rabbi Alan Kaplan, then head of the union’s New Congregations Committee, the decision will be “a watershed in the history of the Reform movement”.[4]

Location[edit]

Congregation Beth Adam’s building, located on Loveland-Madeira Road, was dedicated on September 7, 2001. The synagogue is unique in that it fully incorporates science into its religious space.[5] In the sanctuary, the 12 stained-glass windows depict the Big Bang, evolution of life on earth, and science. The Eternal Light (Ner Tamid) that is over the ark which holds the Torah is a double helix representing DNA.

Services[edit]

Congregation Beth Adam launched its online initiative OurJewishCommunity.org.[6] This was one of the first online Jewish congregations in the United States.[citation needed] As technology has changed, OurJewishCommunity.org has been fully integrated into Beth Adam’s primary website. Both Beth Adam and OurJewishCommunity operate Facebook pages to serve those in greater Cincinnati and those outside the community.

Congregation Beth Adam launched Our Village, a revolutionary approach to youth education.[citation needed] The program has been redesigned to provide experiential learning opportunities rather than the traditional mode of religious education.

References[edit]

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  1. ^ .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit;word-wrap:break-word}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation:target{background-color:rgba(0,127,255,0.133)}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free.id-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited.id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration.id-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription.id-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#2C882D;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}@media(prefers-color-scheme:dark){html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}}Gonzalez, David (June 11, 1994). “Temple With No Place For God Seeks a Place”. The New York Times. Retrieved February 12, 2015.
  2. ^ “Mission, Vision and Values”. Congregation Beth Adam. Archived from the original on 2020-04-02.
  3. ^ “History & Overview of Reform Judaism”. www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org. Retrieved 2021-01-19.
  4. ^ Niebuhr, Gustav (June 30, 1994). “Humanist Synagogue Tests Reform Judaism”. The Washington Post.
  5. ^ Eigelbach, Kevin (May 1, 2016). “Moving from ‘old Judaism to bold Judaism’. Archived from the original on 2016-05-02.
  6. ^ Dehart, Jonathan (December 9, 2008). “Congregation Beth Adam: progressive Judaism coming to a computer near you”. Soapbox Cincinnati.

External links[edit]

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